Aristotle Now and Then
2013 Annual ACPA Meeting
(1 November-November 3)

2013 Program

American Catholic Philosophical Association

2013 Annual Meeting

Sheraton Indianapolis City CentreMar

31 West Ohio St.,

Indianapolis, IN 46204 

www.sheratonindianapoliscitycentre.com

1-317-635-2000

 

Thursday, 31 October 2013

6:00pm-10:00pm Meeting of the Executive Council of the ACPA. Meeting at Allison Mansion, Marian University

(Please assemble at the Sheraton Hotel Lobby at 5:30pm for cab rides to Allison Mansion.)

 

Friday, 1 November 2013

7:30am – Holy Mass                                                                                                                         Meridian Ballroom West

10:00am-12:00pm – Satellite Sessions, Time Slot I:

            1.         International Étienne Gilson Society Session I                                                         Michigan

            2.         The Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy                                    Circle Center

            3.         ACPA Sponsored Satellite Session A                                                                       Illinois

            4.         ACPA Sponsored Satellite Session B                                                                       Panorama B

            5.         Gratitude for the Small Gift: Neglected Passages of Aristotle’s Metaphysics         Ohio

            6.         ACPA Sponsored Satellite C                                                                                    Circle East

            7.         Aquinas and the ‘Arabs’ I                                                                                         Library

            8.         International Society for MacIntyrean Enquiry                                                        Meridian East

12:00pm-6:00pm – Registration & Book Exhibit                                                                            Circle West

1:00pm-3:00pm – Satellite Sessions, Time Slot II:

            9.         Gabriel Marcel Society                                                                                             Michigan

            10.       International Étienne Gilson Society Session II                                                       Circle Center

            11.       The Lonergan Philosophical Society: “Sartre and Lonergan”                                  Illinois

            12.       The Society for the Study of Nature and the Philosophy of Science I                     Panorama B

            13.       Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics                                                          Ohio 

            14.       Philosophers in Jesuit Education                                                                              Circle East

            15.       Aquinas and the ‘Arabs’ II                                                                                        Library

            16.       ACPA Sponsored Satellite D                                                                                    Meridian East

 

3:30pm-5:30pm – ACPA Contributed Papers, Time Slot I

 

Session I:                      Reviving Aristotelian Natural Science?                                                  Michigan

Chair:                           Tom McLaughlin, St. John Vianney Seminary, Denver

Speaker:                       Christopher O. Blum, Thomas More College of Liberal Arts

                                      “The Prospect of an Aristotelian Biology”

Commentator:             Jean De Groot, Catholic University of America

Speaker:                       Michael W. Tkacz, Gonzaga University

                                    “Albertus Magnus and the Animal Histories: A Medieval Anticipation

                                     of Recent Developments in Aristotle Studies”

Commentator:             Patrick McDonald, Seattle Pacific University

 

Session II:                    Aristotle on the Intellect                                                                            Illinois

Chair:                           Fran O'Rourke, University College, Dublin

Speaker:                       Mary Elizabeth Tetzlaff, The Catholic University of America

                                    “An Alternative Reading of De Anima 413a8-9”

Commentator:             Arthur Madigan, SJ, Boston College

Speaker:                       Jonathan A. Buttaci, University of Pittsburgh

                                    “Aristotle’s Intellects: Now and Then”

Commentator:             Joseph Hattrup, Thomas Aquinas College

 

Session III:                   Virtue and Rhetoric                                                                                  Circle Center

Chair:                           Alice Ramos, St. John's University, NY

Speaker:                       Anne M. Wiles, James Madison University

                                      “The Aristotelian Structure of Justice in the Divine Comedy”

Commentator:             Patrick Gardner, Thomas Aquinas College

Speaker:                       Gregory R. Beabout, Saint Louis University

                                    “What Contemporary Virtue Ethics Might Learn from Aristotle's Rhetoric”

Commentator:             Tom Cavanaugh, University of San Francisco

 

Session IV:                   Goodness and Moral Theory                                                                    Circle East

Chair:                           Bonnie Kent, University of California, Irvine

Speaker:                       Leonard Ferry, University of Toronto

                                    “Stumped: Why is Aquinas' moral theory non-Aristotelian?”

Commentator:             Therese Cory, Seattle University

Speaker:                       Sebastian Purcell, State University of New York College at Cortland

                                    “Natural Goodness and The Normativity Challenge”

Commentator:             Phillip Goggans, Morehead State University

 

8:00pm-10:00pm – Plenary Session I                                                                                            Meridian Ballroom West

Chair:                            Daniel Dahlstrom, Vice President, ACPA, Silber Professor of Philosophy, Boston University

Speaker                        John O’Callaghan, ACPA President, Director of the Jacques Maritain Center,

                                       University of Notre Dame

                                      “Three Rival Versions of Thomism: The Strange Case of Sellars, McDowell, and….”

Speaker:                       Alasdair MacIntyre, Rev. John A. O'Brien Senior Research Professor of Philosophy,

                                       University of Notre Dame

                                      “Philosophical Education Against Contemporary Culture”

10:00pm-12:00am – Reception hosted by Marian and IUPUI                                                          Panorama Ballroom

 

Saturday, 2 November 2013

7:30am – Holy Concelebrated Mass                                                                                                 Meridian Ballroom West

8:30am-6:00pm – Registration & Book Exhibit                                                                               Circle West

 

9:00am-11:00am – Plenary Session II                                                                                           Meridian Ballroom West 

Chair:                             John O’Callaghan, President, ACPA

Speaker:                         Candace Vogler, David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor of Philosophy, University of Chicago.

                                         “Good and Bad in Human Action”

Speaker:                          V. Bradley Lewis, Philosophy, The Catholic University of America

                                          “Aristotle, the Common Good, and Us.”

 

11:15am-11:45am – ACPA Business Meeting                                                                                 Meridian Ballroom West

11:30am-1:00pm – Women’s Luncheon (reservation required)                                                       Illinois Room, 21st floor

 

1:00pm-3:00pm – ACPA Contributed Papers, Time Slot II


Session V:                     Brains and Minds                                                                                     Michigan

Chair:                            Michael Storck, Ohio Dominican University

Speaker:                       Turner Nevitt, Fordham University

                                      “Sensation in Aristotle: Some Problematic Contemporary Interpretations and a Medieval Solution”

Commentator:              Conor Hill, University of St Francis in Joliet, IL

Speaker:                        Geoffrey A. Meadows and Daniel D. De Haan, Center for Thomistic Studies,

                                       University of St. Thomas (TX)

                                      “Aristotle and the Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience”

Commentator:             John Greco, St. Louis University

 

Session VI:                   Action, Willing, and Knowing                                                                  Illinois

Chair:                           Richard Taylor, Marquette University

Speaker:                       Traci Phillipson, Marquette University and KU Leuven

                                     “The Will in Averroes and Aquinas”

Commentator:             E.M. Macierowski, Benedictine College

Speaker:                       John Schwenkler, Mount St. Mary's University (MD)

                                    “On Doing and Knowing”

Commentator:             Alexander R. Eodice, Iona College

 

Session VII:                  Persons and Practices                                                                               Circle Center

Chair:                           Randall Smith, University of St. Thomas (TX)

Speaker:                       Douglas Kries, Gonzaga University

                                    “Leo Strauss on Why Aristotle is the Founder of Political Science but Not of Political Philosophy”

Commentator:            John Hittinger, Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas (TX)

Speaker:                      Daniel P. Maher, Assumption College

                                    “Aristotle on Friendship and Teaching Philosophy”

Commentator:            John W. Peck, SJ, Loyola University Maryland

 

Session VIII:     Humorous or Serious?                                                                                         Circle East

Chair:                           Gloria Frost, University of St. Thomas (MN)

Speaker:                       Mathew Lu, University of St. Thomas (MN)

                                    “Getting Serious about Seriousness, Aristotle on the meaning of  Spoudaios”

Commentator:             Stephen Baldner, St. Francis Xavier, Antigonish, NS

Speaker:                       Joshua Schulz, DeSales University

                                    “How Do You Know If You Haven’t Tried It? Aristotelian Reflections on Hateful Humor”

Commentator:             Fr. Julian Davies OFM, Siena College

 

3:30pm-5:30pm – Satellite Sessions, Time Slot III:

            17.       Society for Thomistic Natural Philosophy                                                                Michigan

            18.       Society for Thomistic Personalism I                                                                         Circle Center

            19.       Society of Christian Philosophers                                                                             Illinois

            20.       ACPA Sponsored Satellite E                                                                                     Panorama B

            21.       Society for Continental Philosophy and Theology                                                   Ohio   

            22.       International Institute for Hermeneutics                                                                   Circle East

            23.       ACPA Committee on Priestly Formation                                                                 Meridian East

            24.       Enduring Relevance of Hegel                                                                                   Library

 

6:00pm-7:00pm – Holy Concelebrated Mass                                                                                   Meridian Ballroom West

7:00pm-7:30pm – Reception                                                                                                             Meridian Ballroom

7:30pm-9:30pm – ACPA Banquet                                                                                                 Meridian Ballroom

Presentation of the ACPA Young Scholar’s Award:                                        

                                                                 Mary Elizabeth Tetzlaff, The Catholic University of America

                                                                 Geoffrey A. Meadows and Daniel D. De Haan,

                                                                 Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas (TX)

Introduction of the Aquinas Medalist:    Fr. Theodore Vitali, St. Louis University                                              

Aquinas Medalist:                                   Eleonore Stump, Robert J. Henle Professor of Philosophy, St. Louis University

                                                                “The Nature of a Simple God”

 

Sunday, 3 November 2013

7:00am – Holy Mass                                                                                                                         Meridian Ballroom West

8:00am-12:00pm – Book Exhibit                                                                                                      Circle West

9:00am-11:00am – Satellite Sessions, Time Slot IV

            25.       The Society for the Study of Nature and the Philosophy of Science II                     Circle Center

            26.       Society for Thomistic Personalism II                                                                        Michigan

            27.       Institute for Saint Anselm Studies                                                                             Illinois

            28.       ACPA Sponsored Satellite F                                                                                     Panorama B

            29.       Society for the Study of Cardinal Newman                                                               Ohio

            30.       Dietrich von Hildebrand Legacy Project                                                                   Circle East

            31.       Author meets Critics                                                                                                  Library

            32.       Society for Catholicism and Analytic Philosophy                                                    Meridian East


Satellite Sessions Detailed Program 

 Time Slot I: Friday, 1 November, 10:00am-12:00pm

 

1. International Étienne Gilson Society Session I                                                                             Michigan

Topic:              Aristotelianism, Thomism, and Science

Organizer:        Richard Fafara, Adler-Aquinas Institute

Chair:               Peter A. Redpath, Adler-Aquinas Institute

Speaker:           Peter A. Redpath, Adler-Aquinas Institute

                        “The Essential Connection between Utopian Socialism and Contemporary Science”

Speaker:           Jude P. Dougherty, Catholic University of America

                        “The Reciprocal Influence of Science and Culture”

 

2. The Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy                                                         Circle Center

Topic:              Pragmatism and the Religious Life

Organizer and Chair: Charles A. Hobbs, Gonzaga University

Speaker:           Kees De Waal, Indiana University--Purdue University, Indianapolis

                        “The Marriage of Religion and Science Reconsidered: Taking Cues from Peirce”

Speaker:           Wayne Pomerleau, Gonzaga University

                       “A Pragmatic Approach to Religious Commitment (for the Twenty-first Century)”

Speaker:           Chris Tirres, DePaul University

                       “Dewey and Mexican Religion, Then and Now: Rethinking the Place of Education and Aesthetics”                   

 

3. ACPA Sponsored Satellite Session A                                                                                           Illinois

Topic:              Aristotle “Then”

Chair:               R. E. Houser, Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas (TX)

Speaker:           Nicholas Setliff, Saint Louis University

                        “Discernment or Phronesis: Techne or Arete?

Speaker:           Daniel Wagner, Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas (TX)

                         “ΣΥΛΛΟΓΙΣΜΟΣ ΤΟΥ ΠΡΑΚΤΟΥ: St. Thomas Aquinas’ Aristotelian Solution to

                          the Problem of the Practical Syllogism”

Speaker:           Rev. Orestes J. Gonzalez, LC

                       “St. Thomas’ Aristotle and Actus Essendi

 

4. ACPA Sponsored Satellite Session B                                                                                           Panorama B

Topic:              Aquinas on God

Chair:               Daniel Thero, Rennasalier Polytechnic Institute

Speaker:           Logan Paul Gage, Baylor University

                        “Two Forms of Teleological Argument? Paley, Aquinas, & Modern Thomism”

Speaker:           Domenic D'Ettore, Marian University

                        “Analogy of Proportionality in Thomas Aquinas’ Prima Via”

Speaker:           Lindsay Cleveland, Baylor University

                        “A Thomistic Account of the Resemblance of Divine and Human Attributes in Support of Divine Simplicity”

 

5. Gratitude for the Small Gift: Neglected Passages of Aristotle’s Metaphysics                              Ohio              

Organizer:        Joshua P. Hochschild, Mount St. Mary’s University

Chair:               Fr. Daniel Moloney

Speaker:           Christopher O. Blum, Augustine Institute

                        “The Science of Truth and the Perfection of the Knower in Met. α

Speaker:           Joshua P. Hochschild, Mount St. Mary’s University

                        “Clues to Dialectical Progress in the Reformulated Aporiae of Metaphysics K”

Speaker:           Christopher V. Mirus, University of Dallas

                        “Ensouled Lines: The Metaphysics of Magnitude in M”

 

6. ACPA Sponsored Satellite C                                                                                                         Circle East

Topic:              Knowledge

Chair:               Catherine Peters, Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas (TX)

Speaker:           Nathan Poage, Houston Community College

                        “Avicenna on the subordination of the sciences”

Speaker:           Samuel Murray, Saint Louis University

                        “Intellect in the Soul: Aristotle’s De Anima III.5”

Speaker:           Joel Potter, State University of New York at Buffalo

                        “Aristotle’s Argument from Wonder in Metaphysics A

 

7. Aquinas and the ‘Arabs’ I                                                                                                              Library

Organizer:        Richard C. Taylor, Marquette University

Chair:               Luis X. Lopéz-Farjeat, Universidad Panamericana Mexico City

Speaker:           Richard C. Taylor, Marquette University

                        “Divine Will in the Plotiniana Arabica and Avicenna”

Commentator: Luis X. Lopéz-Farjeat, Universidad Panamericana Mexico City

Speaker:           Sarah Pessin, University of Denver

                        “Divine Will and Related Issues in Ibn Gabirol / Avicebron”

Commentator: Richard C. Taylor, Marquette University

 

8. International Society for MacIntyrean Enquiry                                                                            Meridian East

Topic:              Evolution and Truth

Organizer and Chair: Christopher S. Lutz, Saint Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology

Speaker:           James Mahon, Washington and Lee University

                        “MacIntyre on Truthfulness and Lying”

Speaker:           Fran O’Rourke, University College Dublin

                        “Aristotle and Evolutionary Altruism”

 

Time Slot II: Friday, 1 November, 1:00pm-3:00pm


9. Gabriel Marcel Society                                                                                                                 Michigan

Organizer:        Brendan Sweetman, Rockhurst University

Chair:               David W. Rodick, Xavier University

Speaker:           Geoffery Karabin, Neumann University

                        “A Marcelian Betrayal?: The Scandal of Death versus an Afterlife of Love”

Speaker:           David W. Rodick, Xavier University

                        “Making a Case for Marcel in the 21st Century”

 

10. International Étienne Gilson Society Session II                                                                          Circle Center

Topic:              Aristotelianism, Thomism, and Science

Organizer:        Richard Fafara, Adler-Aquinas Institute

Chair:               Curtis L. Hancock, Rockhurst University

Speaker:           Richard Fafara, Adler-Aquinas Institute           

                        “Pascal’s Heir”

Speaker:           Curtis L. Hancock, Rockhurst University

                        “The Need to Reunify Philosophy and Science”

Speaker:           John Deely, Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas (TX)

                        “Relative Being and the Categories: the Need for a New Approach”

 

11. The Lonergan Philosophical Society: “Sartre and Lonergan”                                                    Illinois

Topic:              Sartre and Lonergan

Organizer and Chair: Elizabeth Murray, Loyola Marymount University

Speaker:           James Marsh, Fordham University

                        “Sartre's Notion of Freedom: A Lonerganian Critique”

Commentator: Michael Sharkey, University of Wisconsin

Speaker:           Elizabeth Murray, Loyola Marymount University

                        “Inside Hate Speech: Ideology and Passion”

Commentator: Robert Wood, University of Dallas

 

12. The Society for the Study of Nature and the Philosophy of Science I                                        Panorama B

Topic:              Themes in Aristotle's Philosophy of Nature

Organizer:        David Grothoff, The Catholic University of America

Chair:               Erikk Geannikis, The Catholic University of America

Speaker:           Ryan Shea, The Catholic University of America

                        “Nature, Necessity, and Indeterminacy in Aristotle's Physics II”

Speaker:           John G. Brungardt, The Catholic University of America

                        “Cosmic Place and Time in Aristotle's Physics as Clues About the First Moved Mover”

Speaker:           Patrick McNeela, Indiana University

                        “Explanation or Causation or Both? Aristotle and Contemporary Philosophy of Science”

 

13. Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics                                                                             Ohio

Topic:              On Demonstration in Maimonides’ Natural Theology

Organizer and Chair: Alex Hall, Clayton State University

Speaker:           Kenneth Seeskin, Northwestern University     

                        “Creation and the Argument from Particularity”

Speaker:           Jamie Spiering, Benedictine College

                        “The Sixth Method doesn’t work, but the Third Way does? Maimonides

                        on the Role of Possibility in Proving God’s Existence”

 

14. Philosophers in Jesuit Education                                                                                                 Circle East

Topic:              Trust

Organizer:        Joseph Godfrey, Saint Joseph’s University

Chair:               John Greco, Saint Louis University

Speaker:           Joseph Godfrey, Saint Joseph’s University

                        “Thinking about Trust: A Discussion”

 

15. Aquinas and the ‘Arabs’ II                                                                                                          Library

Topic:              God and Love

Organizer and Chair: Richard C. Taylor, Marquette University

Speaker:           Jon McGinnis, University of Missouri at St Louis

                        “A Principle of Charity: Divine Love in Some Medieval Muslim Thinkers and Thomas Aquinas”

Commentator: Therese-Anne Druart, The Catholic University of America

Speaker:           Joseph Steineger, University of Chicago

                        “John of Damascus, Avicenna, and the Naturally Implanted Knowledge

                         of God’s Existence in Bonaventure and Aquinas”

Commentator: Timothy Noone, The Catholic University of America

 

16. ACPA Sponsored Satellite D                                                                                                      Meridian East

Topic:              Ethics

Chair:               Mary C. Sommers, Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas (TX)       

Speaker:           Colleen McCluskey, Saint Louis University

                        “Aristotle’s Function Argument Transformed”

Speaker:           Michael P. Krom, Saint Vincent College

                        “Natural Religion and Imperfect Happiness: Reassessing Aquinas’s Twofold Human Good”

Speaker:           Beth Rath, Saint Louis University

                        “Receiving Oneself: Kierkegaard on the Virtue of Active Receptivity”

 

Time Slot III: Saturday, 2 November, 3:30pm-5:30pm


17. Society for Thomistic Natural Philosophy                                                                                  Michigan

Organizer and Chair: Michael W. Tkacz, Gonzaga University

Speaker:           Jude P. Dougherty, The Catholic University of America

                        “Intelligibility”

Speaker:           John P. Hittinger, Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas (TX)

                        “Attraction and Repulsion: Thomism, Positivism, and Wallace’s Modeling of Nature

 

18. Society for Thomistic Personalism I                                                                                           Circle Center

Topic:              Being, Substance, and Person

Organizer and Chair: R. Mary H. Lemmons, University of St. Thomas (MN)          

Speaker:           Siobhan Nash-Marshall, Manhattanville College

                        “Norris Clarke and Plantinga on Being.”

Speaker:           Mark Spencer, University of St. Thomas (MN)

                        “Aristotelian Substance and Personalistic Subjectivity.”

 

19. Society of Christian Philosophers                                                                                               Illinois

Topic:              Freedom and Control

Organizer and Chair: Stephen R. Grimm, Fordham University

Speaker:           Amy Seymour, University of Notre Dame

                        “Freedom, Foreknowledge, and Betting”

Commentator: Philip Woodward, Indiana University

Speaker:           Meg Schmitt, University of Notre Dame                     

                        “Freedom and (Theoretical) Reason”

Commentator: Timothy Perrine, Indiana University

 

20. ACPA Sponsored Satellite E                                                                                                       Panorama B

Topic:              Aristotle “Now”

Chair:               M. Ross Romero, SJ, Creighton University

Speaker:           Craig Condella, Salve Regina University

                        “Of Nature Unseen: Founding an Eco-conscious in Heidegger and Aristotle”

Speaker:           James Dominic Rooney, OP, Aquinas Institute of Theology (MO)

                        “Aristotle, Empedocles, and the Modern Species Problem”

Speaker:           Michael Barnwell, Niagara University

                        “The Problem with Aquinas's ‘Original Discovery’”

 

21. Society for Continental Philosophy and Theology                                                                     Ohio

Topic: Book Session: Reexamining Deconstruction and Determinate Religion

Organizer and Chair: Bruce Ellis Benson, Wheaton College

Commentator: Neal DeRoo, Dordt College

Commentator: Christopher Boesel, Drew University

Response:         Bruce Ellis Benson, Wheaton College

Response:         J. Aaron Simmons, Furman University

 

22. International Institute for Hermeneutics                                                                                     Circle East

Organizer and Chair: Andrzej Wiercinski, Albert Ludwigs Universität Freiburg, Germany     

Speaker:           Seamus J. O’Neill, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada

                        “Augustine’s Christology: Christ, the Devil, and the Two Hells”

Speaker:           Hans Feichtinger, Hochschule für Philosophie, Munich, Germany

                        “Comparative Christology: Augustine on Humility and Other Religions

Speaker:           Francesco Forlin, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Italy

                        “Christ as Logos in Hegel’s Vorlesungen ueber die Philosophie der Religion

Speaker:           Andrzej Wiercinski, Albert Ludwigs Universität Freiburg, Germany

                        “The Christ Event: Challenges of Philosophical Christology”

 

23. ACPA Committee on Priestly Formation                                                                                   Meridian East

Organizer and Chair: David Ruel Foster, Athenaeum of Ohio

Speaker:           John C. McCarthy, Dean, CUA School of Philosophy

                        “Philosophy and Scholasticism”

Speaker:           Tracy Jamison, Mount St. Mary of the West Seminary

                        “Two Rival Definitions of Marriage: Classical Realist v. Liberal Modernist

                         (e.g. U.S. Catholic Bishops v. U.S. Supreme Court)”

 

24. The Enduring Relevance of Hegel                                                                                              Library

Topic:              Hegel and Aristotle

Organizer:        Robert E. Wood, University of Dallas

Chair:               Jeffery Kinlaw, McMurray University

Speaker:           Robert E. Wood, University of Dallas

                        “Hegel as Aristotelian”

Speaker:           Michael Baur, Fordham University

                        “Hegel and Aristotle on the Identity of Knower and Known”

 

Time Slot IV: Sunday, 3 November, 9:00am-11:00am


25. The Society for the Study of Nature and the Philosophy of Science II                                      Circle Center

Topic:              Themes in Aristotle's Philosophy of Mathematics

Organizer:        John G. Brungardt, The Catholic University of America

Chair:               Ryan Shea, The Catholic University of America

Speaker:           Erikk Geannikis, The Catholic University of America

                        “The Response to Zeno's Paradoxes and Aristotle's Philosophy of Mathematics”

Speaker:           David Grothoff, The Catholic University of America

                        “Aristotle on Mathematical and Physical Extension”

Speaker:           Blaise Blain, The Catholic University of America

                        “Aristotle's Account of Demonstration in the Subordinate Sciences”

 

26. Society for Thomistic Personalism II                                                                                         Michigan

Topic:              Wojtyla’s Personalism

Organizer and Chair: R. Mary H. Lemmons, University of St. Thomas (MN)

Speaker:           Brian Kemple, Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas (TX)

                        “Wojtyla: Nature, Person, and Teleology.”

Speaker:           Francisco Plaza, Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas (TX)

                        “Karol Wojtyla's Broader Sense of Alienation.”

 

27. Institute for Saint Anselm Studies                                                                                              Illinois

Topic:              Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas on the Human Person

Organizer and Chair: Montague Brown, Saint Anselm College

Speaker:           Fr. David Meconi, S.J., Saint Louis University

                        “Human Deiformity in the Thought of Augustine and Anselm”

Speaker:           Kevin McMahon, Saint Anselm College

                        “The Human Person and Anselm’s Doctrine of the Imago Dei”

Speaker:           Gavin Colvert, Assumption College

                        “Person Agency and Freedom in Anselm and Aquinas”

 

28. ACPA Sponsored Satellite F                                                                                                       Panorama B

Topic:              Ethics

Chair:               Scott Cleveland, Baylor University

Speaker:           Michael R. Kelly, University of San Diego

                       “A Phenomenological Development of Aristotle’s Account of Envy and Emulation”

Speaker:           Margaret Hughes, College of Mount Saint Vincent

                        “Josef Pieper on Love and Moral Formation”

Speaker:           Anthony T. Flood, North Dakota State University

                        “Zagzebski’s Account of Moral Understanding and Aquinas’s Notion of Docilitas

 

29. Society for the Study of Cardinal Newman                                                                                 Ohio

Topic:              Cardinal Newman on Certainty and Wisdom

Organizer:        Michael Baur, Fordham University

Chair:               Frederick D. Aquino, Abilene Christian University

Speaker:           Brandon Dahm, Baylor University

                        “The Certainty of Faith: A Problem for Christian Fallibilists?”

Commentator: Stephen Grimm, Fordham University

Speaker:           Michael Baur, Fordham University

                        “The Cultivation of Wisdom and the Purpose of the University”

Commentator: Frederick D. Aquino, Abilene Christian University

 

30. Dietrich von Hildebrand Legacy Project                                                                                    Circle East

Topic:              Dietrich von Hildebrand and Kierkegaard

Organizer and Chair: John F. Crosby, Franciscan University of Steubenville

Speaker:           John Davenport, Fordham University

                        "Kierkegaard and Dietrich von Hildebrand on Preferential and Agapaic Loves"

Respondents:   John F. Crosby, Franciscan University of Steubenville

                           Ann-Therese Gardner, Catholic University of America

 

31. Author meets Critics                                                                                                                    Library

Topic:              Reason, Tradition, and the Good: MacIntyre's Tradition-Constituted

                          Reason and Frankfurt School Critical Theory

Organizer:        Jeff Nicholas, Providence College

Author:            Jeff Nicholas, Providence College

 

32. Society for Catholicism and Analytical Philosophy                                                                   Meridian East

Organizer:        Patrick Toner, Wake Forest University

Chair:               Gavin Colvert, Assumption College

Speaker:           Angela McKay Knobel, Catholic University of America

                        “Is Infused Virtue Incoherent?”

Speaker:           Jonathan Sanford, Franciscan University of Steubenville

                        “What is a Virtue Ethicist?”

 

Abstracts of Contributed Papers

Session I: Reviving Aristotelian Natural Science?

“The Prospect of an Aristotelian Biology”

Christopher O. Blum, Thomas More College of Liberal Arts

In recent decades, a growing number of biologists has testified to the priority of the whole organism with respect to its parts and protested against the dominance of mechanist and reductionist accounts of the organism in biological science. To see disinterested inquiry thus shaped “by constraint of facts” (Parts of Animals 1.1.642a28) will delight, but cannot surprise, an Aristotelian. Taking this rediscovery of nature by biologists as an occasion for reflection, this essay considers, first, what is presupposed by any healthy biological inquiry, second, the prospects of renewal for the science itself, and, finally, a good that could follow from such a renewal. Aristotelian biology is an invitation to consider the forms of living things. Since “philosophy claims to know” (Metaphysics 4.2.1004b25), philosophers are called to bear witness to the primacy of form and, like biologists, to be models of attentiveness to form.                             

 

“Albertus Magnus and the Animal Histories: A Medieval Anticipation of Recent Developments in Aristotle Studies”

Michael W. Tkacz, Gonzaga University

During the past three decades, Aristotle studies have been significantly influenced by a series of ground-breaking investigations of the zoological works, especially the Historia animalium. As a result, contemporary Aristotle scholars have developed a clearer and more consistent interpretation of the zoology and have demonstrated its consonance with Aristotle’s logic and metaphysics. This revolution in Aristotle studies was anticipated by the medieval natural philosopher Albertus Magnus. As the first thinker since Theophrastus to pursue an Aristotelian research program in the life sciences, he interpreted Aristotle’s animal histories as a series of pre-demonstrative researches preparatory to causal explanation as prescribed in the Posterior Analytics and the Topics. The medieval anticipation of these recent developments in Aristotle studies provides a compelling comparison of the interpretation of Aristotle now and then.                            

 

Session II: Aristotle on the Intellect

“An Alternative Reading of De Anima 413a8-9”

Mary Elizabeth Tetzlaff, The Catholic University of America

This paper presents three interpretations of the infamous “sailor/ship” sentence that concludes Aristotle’s De Anima II.1. The first two interpretations represent the ones most popular in contemporary scholarship; the final is the author’s original. The interpretations are then evaluated with respect to grammatical plausibility and explanatory strength. The paper makes a case that the new reading answers to both points of evaluation and contributes to an interpretive approach to Aristotle’s De Anima that values the coherence and cogency of this work as a whole.              

               

“Aristotle’s Intellects: Now and Then”

Jonathan A Buttaci, University of Pittsburgh

One of the most highly debated passages in Aristotle is his doctrine of the nous poietikos of De Anima III.5. The interpretations of its precise nature and operation that were given by ancient and medieval commentators abound also today. With few exceptions, however, present-day interpretations disagree with the ancients and others on the logic of the passage. In particular, while most ancient and medieval commentators agree that there are three intellects or intellectual powers on scene in the passage, most contemporary interpreters assume that there are only two, identifying the pathetikos nous at the end of III.5 with the intellect described in III.4. In this paper I argue that this assumption is wrong, and that although the text is underdetermined in several ways, it is not so in this respect. The text, taken with other relevant passages, demands that the pathetikos nous be different from the intellect described in III.4.

 

Session III: Virtue and Rhetoric

“The Aristotelian Structure of Justice in the Divine Comedy”

Anne M. Wiles, James Madison University

The argument of this paper is that the Aristotelian analysis of justice and related concepts provides the best framework for understanding the structure and importance of justice in Dante’s Commedia. After giving a synopsis of the principle features of Aristotle’s account of justice in Book 5 of the Nicomachean Ethics, I consider a few scenes from the Inferno, the Purgatorio, and the Paradiso, showing how the punishments and rewards Dante describes are based on the Aristotelian analysis of justice. Finally, I show that Dante, following Aristotle’s views on the metaphysics of the human person, recognizes that argument alone is inadequate to the task of educating the reader on the proper care of the soul, and that Dante’s effective use of images, makes the abstract Aristotelian concept of justice vivid and attractive, and its opposite repulsive.

 

“What Contemporary Virtue Ethics Might Learn from Aristotle's Rhetoric”

                                    Gregory R. Beabout, Saint Louis University

In this paper, I extend contemporary virtue ethics by pointing to a philosophical insight that emerges from Aristotle’s Rhetoric: technical mastery of a discipline or practice involves cultivating the virtue of practical wisdom. After reviewing features of Alasdair MacIntyre’s virtue ethics, I draw attention to specific virtues identified by MacIntyre while noting the relative absence of the virtue of practical wisdom in his discussion of social practices. I compare and contrast MacIntyre’s virtue ethics with that of Aristotle. Focusing on Aristotle’s Rhetoric, I show how Aristotle suggests that the virtue of practical wisdom is integral to technical mastery in the art of persuasive public speaking. I argue that Aristotle’s insight about the tight connection between practical wisdom and technical mastery is not limited to the art of rhetoric. Retrieving insights from Aristotle’s Rhetoric brings into focus ways in which the virtue of practical wisdom is requisite to technical mastery more generally.                         

 

Session IV: Goodness and Moral Theory

“Stumped: Why is Aquinas' moral theory non-Aristotelian?”

Leonard Ferry, University of Toronto

Eleonore Stump has recently argued that the Aristotelian foundations of Aquinas’ virtue theory have not only been exaggerated but are mistaken. She does not dispute Aquinas’ familiarity with and dependence on Aristotle’s moral theory. Instead, she argues that Aquinas’ ethics must be seen as essentially second-personal, where the central relationship is between the moral agent and the Holy Spirit, specifically the gifts of the Holy Spirit and the theological virtues. Her argument for displacing Aristotle, however, advances at least two questionable fronts. On the one hand, she claims that the acquired, Aristotelian moral virtues are, for Aquinas, not real virtues at all. Only the infused moral virtues are real. On the other hand, she argues that the Aristotelian-bias of many descriptions of Aquinas’ moral theory over-emphasizes the role of reason in Aquinas’ ethics. Against this prevailing view, Stump contends that Aquinas is, in a limited way, closer to Hume in privileging the passions over reason. I challenge Stump’s attempted displacement of Aristotle by questioning her on both of these fronts.                           

 

“Natural Goodness and The Normativity Challenge”

Sebastian Purcell, State University of New York College at Cortland

The present essay aims to respond to one of the most recent empirical challenges posed to an Aristotelian based virtue ethics. In the course of the debate concerning the existence of character traits a second and more recent challenge has emerged, which Jesse Prinz has called The Normativity Challenge. The argument in this case is that the empirical study of happiness undertaken by psychologists, sociologists and anthropologists, reveals that the end which virtues are supposed to support, namely happiness, is so thoroughly culturally specific that an Aristotelian virtue ethics cannot hope to stand as an alternative to other forms of ethics. In response I argue that Prinz’s critique is committed to two presuppositions about Aristotle’s conception of eudaimonia that are not supported by a careful reading of the Nicomachean Ethics, one of which is a careful understanding of natural goodness, so that the sociological evidence he produces do not support the conclusion he supposes that they do.                                

 

Session V: Brains and Minds

“Sensation in Aristotle: Some Problematic Contemporary Interpretations and a Medieval Solution”

Turner Nevitt, Fordham University

Richard Sorabji and Miles Burnyeat have developed and defended rival interpretations of Aristotle’s account of sensation. Both agree in accepting the common terms of Aristotle’s account (alteration, transition from potentiality to actuality, reception of form without matter, etc.), but they disagree about how they are to be understood. In this paper I consider these rival interpretations, examining the best arguments for each and raising new objections to both. I argue that each contemporary interpretation, in its own way, faces the same problem of being unable to accommodate everything that Aristotle says in his account of sensation. In the search for an alternative interpretation I suggest turning to the medieval tradition, and particularly the interpretation developed by Thomas Aquinas in his commentary on Aristotle’s De anima. I argue that Aquinas’s interpretation deserves more attention because it retains the best features of its two contemporary rivals while avoiding the problems facing each.                                   

 

“Aristotle and the Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience”

Geoffrey A. Meadows and Daniel D. De HaanCenter for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas (TX)

This paper aims to show that the thought of Aristotle can shed much light on the irksome problems that lurk around the philosophical foundations of neuroscience. First, we will explore the ramifications of Aristotle’s mereological principle, namely, that it is not the eye that sees, but the human person that sees by the eye. Next, we shall draw upon the riches of Maxwell Bennett’s and Peter Hacker’s Philosophical Foundation of Neuroscience (=PFN) in order to elucidate how Aristotle’s mereological principle can be of service to contemporary neuroscientists, psychologists, and philosophers. In the third and fourth parts we aim to complement the project of PFN by showing how Aristotle’s philosophical anthropology and doctrine of pros hen equivocation can strengthen PFN’s response to eliminativists, reductionists, and other critics of “folk psychology.” Finally, our last section will investigate the kinds of correlations involved in brain scanning techniques, such as fMRI, so as to determine whether the most recent empirical discoveries do in fact support various critics’ rejection of “folk psychology.” We will show that the empirical evidence does not in fact favor eliminativist or reductionist views, and that it encourages the more Aristotelian approach adopted by PFN and ourselves.                              

 

Session VI: Action, Willing, and Knowing

“The Will in Averroes and Aquinas”

Traci Phillipson, Marquette University and KU Leuven

Despite the drastic differences in their views of the intellect and the location and specific function of the will both Aquinas and Averroes are able to claim that their systems allow for moral agency because they both place the will--a faculty that is of prime importance to the process of moral action--in the individual. Both philosophers think that they are following Aristotle in making their claims about the will and the intellects. This paper will examine the issue of will and the related issue of the intellects as it appears in the Aristotelian texts and in the subsequent work of Averroes and Aquinas. It will argue that at least some of the divergence in Averroes and Aquinas can be attributed to (1) an issue of translation regarding De Anima, and (2) a difference in the role of cogitation and the intellects regarding will.                                   

 

“On Doing and Knowing”

John Schwenkler, Mount St. Mary's University (MD)

I propose that the knowledge of what one is intentionally doing counts as “non-observational” because of the role it plays in guiding the action itself. I then consider an objection: is it possible for the knowledge of one’s present action to contribute to the guidance of what one presently does? I argue that this is indeed possible, and that the failure to see how this is rests on questionable metaphysical assumptions about the nature of causality. I conclude by arguing that the causal role of knowledge in action is not reducible to that of mere belief.

 

Session VII: Persons and Practices

“Leo Strauss on Why Aristotle is the Founder of Political Science but Not of Political Philosophy”

Douglas Kries, Gonzaga University

This paper explores Leo Strauss’s puzzling claim, published in an essay on Aristotle’s Politics, that Aristotle was the founder of political science even though Socrates was the founder of political philosophy. In order to explain Strauss’s claim, the paper analyzes the distinction between political science and political philosophy as Strauss understood the matter. This analysis shows that Strauss offers us a very “Socratic” view of Aristotle’s Politics; that is, Aristotle’s political science shares the concern of Socrates for initiating the philosophical quest with a na?ve inquiry into the question of the human good and then urging the inquiry toward the questions of the theoretical or contemplative life. Such a view of Aristotle’s political science, if pursued seriously, would radically alter common approaches to reading Aristotle.                                  

 

“Aristotle on Friendship and Teaching Philosophy”

Daniel P. Maher, Assumption College

In Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle discusses the relation between teachers and students during his treatment of “non-uniform friends.” These friends exchange goods differing in kind (e.g., something useful is exchanged for pleasure). Such friendships arise from the needs of the friends, and we are invited to ask whether some need induces a philosopher to teach a not-yet-philosophical student. In this paper I argue that the philosophical teacher does not approach his pupil out of need nor as he would approach a contemplative friend who is an equal. The teacher chooses to benefit students as a morally virtuous human being would, although not as if his happiness depends upon their success in learning. A teacher is not an ordinary benefactor, intent upon seeing his power made actual in some other person. Aristotle’s philosophical teachers seem to be simultaneously more generous and less interested in their students.

 

Session VIII: Humorous or Serious?

“Getting Serious about Seriousness, Aristotle on the meaning of Spoudaios”

                        Mathew Lu, University of St. Thomas (MN)

In the following paper I discuss the under-appreciated role that the concept of the morally serious person (`o spoudaios) plays in Aristotle’s moral philosophy. I argue that the conventional English rendering of spoudaios as ‘good’ has a tendency to cut us off from important nuances in Aristotle’s consideration of the virtuous person. After discussing aspects of his use of the concept in the Nicomachean Ethics and the Politics I dismiss a misunderstanding of seriousness as a kind of morally indifferent personality trait. Finally, I close by briefly reflecting on how the absence of moral seriousness characterizes much contemporary moral theorizing and produces what Anscombe described as the “corrupt mind.”                               

 

“How Do You Know If You Haven’t Tried It? Aristotelian Reflections on Hateful Humor”

Joshua Schulz, DeSales University

Howard Curzer argues that Aristotle’s virtue of wit is a social virtue, a form of philia: conversation with a witty person is pleasing rather than offensive or hateful. On the basis of an analogy between wit and temperance, Curzer holds that the witty person is good at detecting (and avoiding) hateful humor but is not necessarily an expert in judging the funniness of jokes. Curzer thus defends a moderate position in contemporary philosophy of humor–a Detraction Account of hateful humor–arguing that the humorousness of a joke is an aggregate pleasure resulting from several factors in addition to funniness. While sympathetic to Curzer’s overall approach to wit, this essay criticizes the Detraction Account as inconsistent with Aristotle’s text and implausible in its own right, and suggests a friendly amendment based on those criticisms.